The Neuroscience of Trust in Organisations

Would you like significantly more energised, engaged, productive, loyal, happy, aligned, healthy, higher earning employees who rave about how great it is to be working for you? Here’s how, backed by reliable research. Discover the 8 leader behaviours that will pay off, big time. Spoiler alert: it’s about TRUST.

Paul Zak is a ground breaking researcher in this field and his work has massive implications for the way to lead organisations for higher productivity …  with less stress!

8 Key Points

If you don’t have time to read this HBR article in full, here are the 8 key points. If you want help making them happen, give me a call! 

  1. Recognise excellence. It amazes me how rarely we acknowledge this. 
  2. Set stretching but achievable goals. This helps people to get out of their comfort zones, seek help and build teamwork. 
  3. Give freedom to choose. Great people work best when given discretion and autonomy to choose the best way to deliver results.
  4. Let them design their jobs. Going one step further, why not let people focus on the work that they care most about? 
  5. Share your flight plan. Clarify purpose, goals, strategies and tactics – openness leads to buy-in. Being left out of the loop just kills trust. 
  6. Intentionally build relationships. When people care about each other, they help each other out – and, funnily enough, their own performance goes up. 
  7. Invest in whole person growth. Help people fulfil their aspirations and potential. It’s great that they might need to look beyond their current job with you, not a sign of disloyalty! Never again receive a shock, last minute resignation.
  8. Show vulnerability. Asking for help when you need it makes you appear wise and part of the team. Failing to ask for help just makes you seem like a know-it-all jerk. 

Which of these do you most need to work on, starting today? 

Your coach,

Hugh

Teamwork: An Elephant in the Dark

Elephant oblique

Teamwork? Here’s a poem by Rumi, a 13th Century Persian poet. It says a lot about the difference between a bunch of well meaning individuals and a high performing team.

Some Hindus have an elephant to show.

No-one here has seen an elephant.

They bring it at night to a dark room.

One by one, we go in the dark and come out

saying how we experience the animal.

One of us happens to touch the trunk.

A water-pipe kind of creature.

Another, the ear. A very strong, always moving

back and forth, fan-animal. Another, the leg.

I find it still, like a column on a temple.

Another touches the curved back.

A leathery throne. Another, the cleverest,

feels the tusk. A rounded sword made of porcelain.

He is proud of his description.

Each of us touches one place

and understands the whole that way.

The palm and the fingers feeling in the dark

are how the senses explore the reality of the elephant.

If each of us held a candle there, and if we went in together, we could see it.

Drawn from the book I’m currently enjoying, by Elena Aguilar. A brilliant read, sharing her own worst and best experiences of leading teams, and how to build a high performing team. While the organisational setting is education, it’s highly relevant anywhere. Highly recommended. Click the image to get your copy.

Challenge Upwards. It’s a Must.

Badboss

It’s a very tough ask, expecting employees at any level to challenge upwards, even when there are important ethical problems to be resolved. Plenty of companies talk the talk, but the reality is that it rarely happens. Think of Enron, NASA before the Columbia shuttle disaster, or Andersen’s and you’ll realise that saying and doing are vastly different. The reality is that massive consequences can happen further down the track.

What happens when you or a team member notice something that’s wrong and you try to point it out? Do you even get as far as raising it with those upstairs?

What are you doing to safeguard the integrity of your organisation? What’s your company doing?

If you’re not sure how to tackle these questions, here’s the best advice I’ve ever found. Click this link:

Over to you, Marshall Goldsmith! 

 

 

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