“It’s Not Prejudice, But …” Oh Wow.

Prejudice is a blindness. Here’s a perfect example, reported by Coco Liu in the South China Morning Post [SCMP] recently. (I’ve written about some great things – for example this – happening in the business world in China, but not today).

Luo Mingxiong is a venture capitalist. Please show some sympathy, as he is like a blind man who has decided that he also needs to insert ear plugs in case his senses happen to pick up any information that doesn’t fit with his pre-set ideas.

In January 2017 he made a presentation in Beijing, stating that “we usually don’t invest in female chief executive officers”, listing that factor as one of his top 10 reasons not to invest in a company, along with negative attributes like dishonesty and the inability to learn. He went further, declining in general to invest in companies with women on the Board even if the CEO is male. 

Why? 

“It’s not because of any kind of prejudice” he said. “But […] What do women do better than men, except giving birth?” And “Because it shows that the entrepreneur can’t recruit equally excellent and ambitious male executives.” SCMP “This Week in Asia” 22-18th January 2017.

Wow.

In which universe is that NOT screaming the word PREJUDICE? Blind & deaf, he’s leaving the field to much more discerning and intelligent investors. He’s been able to conveniently overlook the stream of statistical evidence that has emerged over recent years to show that companies do better with a balanced, diverse leadership. Here’s one major example. Oh, and here’s how this could add $12 trillion USD to global growth. 

My question to you, dear reader, is this: how can we respond when faced with this kind of wilfully blind prejudice? 

Do we sweep it under the carpet and pretend it has nothing to do with us? Do we prompt competing investors to grab the opportunities and demonstrate success? Do we actively seek such people out and attempt to challenge their world view? 

One powerful response is for those close to the individual – family, friends, colleagues, peers, even courageous direct reports – to express their own alternative view. Stand up, draw a line in the sand and refuse to allow such ‘alternative facts’ to go unquestioned. The earlier the better. 

Being wealthy or famous doesn’t make people right, or wise. 

Kung Hei Fat Choi.

Your Coach, Hugh 

 

Challenge Upwards. It’s a Must.

Badboss

It’s a very tough ask, expecting employees at any level to challenge upwards, even when there are important ethical problems to be resolved. Plenty of companies talk the talk, but the reality is that it rarely happens. Think of Enron, NASA before the Columbia shuttle disaster, or Andersen’s and you’ll realise that saying and doing are vastly different. The reality is that massive consequences can happen further down the track.

What happens when you or a team member notice something that’s wrong and you try to point it out? Do you even get as far as raising it with those upstairs?

What are you doing to safeguard the integrity of your organisation? What’s your company doing?

If you’re not sure how to tackle these questions, here’s the best advice I’ve ever found. Click this link:

Over to you, Marshall Goldsmith! 

 

 

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